Pure Thoughts

In the book God’s Trombones, James Weldon Johnson created poetic verse, highlighting the unique phrasing of the old-time negro preacher. He wrote about pastors and deacons and mothers of the church. They were people who survived a time in American history where slavery was a recent nightmare and Jim Crow Laws were an unwelcomed friend. In his poem, Johnson underscored how many corporate prayers were prefaced. He wrote: “O Lord, we come this morning—knee-bowed and body-bent before Thy throne of grace.” To me, his words described acts of reverence—people coming before God with open and honest hearts.

In developing http://acepackinternational.com/?primre=je-cherche-une-femme-de-m%D0%93%C2%A9nage-agadir&415=61 his response site de rencontre musulman usa more rencontres pluridisciplinaires de diagnostic prĂŠnatal 2014 blog link http://www.redribbonaward.org/marekhamwik/3533 aw site de rencontres site de rencontre jijel site de rencontre adopte moi A Complicated Love Song, I started each writing session with a prayer, expressing my desire to tap into my purest and most childlike thoughts. To make that happen, I had to exhale and clear my head of distractions. Then, with an exposed spirit, I was able to write, approaching my blank page in a manner, once again, best described by James Weldon Johnson—my favorite line in his poem. “We come this morning—like empty pitchers to a full fountain, with no merit of our own.”

Without the weight of self-importance or the arrogance to think my humanity had words of wisdom to convey, I was freed-up to let the story be delivered to my spirit. All I had to do was watch the film in my mind’s eye and put pencil to pad and write an account of what I was viewing. That prescription was the best medicine, enabling me to release my prose.

Determined Lynda’s Final Thought for the Moment: When my baggage is put aside and my mind is empty, my cup is filled to the point of overflowing. —Lynda has magic to do. Do you?

Copyright © 2014, Lynda Jones-Burns. All Rights Reserved.